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Showing posts from March, 2008

This is my body....

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Luke 22:19 says: And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.It is significant that, here, Yeshua said “toutoestintosomamou” (this is my body) rather than, “egoeimihoartos” (I am the bread) as he is recorded saying at another time. It is clear that he did not intend that the emphasis be on him or his own corpse, but rather on the bread itself. Or rather on the “loaf,” which is the correct translation of artos. A closer look at the passage reveals its more likely meaning.The Peshitta states, wnsb lxma wawdy wqca wyhb lhwn wamr hnw pgry del apykwn mtyhb hda hwytwn ebdyn ldwkrnyand he took a loaf and he gave thanks and he broke and he gave them and he said, “this [is] my body for afikoon which [is] given. This you are to prepare for my memorial.”Loafs of bread were significant symbols of the people of Israel.Shewbread (lit. “bread of the face” or “presence bread”) is the name given to …

Blessed is he......

The early portion of the so-called "Sermon on the Mount" has Yeshua delievering the "beatitudes." The word beatitude is from the Latin beatitudo, which means "happiness." Many understand these simples listings to describe the state of mind of a Christian, and some texts translate the first word as "Happy," or "blessed." This is because the Greek word which appears here is makarioi which is normally translated as "they are fortunate," or "they are well off." The blessed nature that these characteristics endow is thought to be psychological. The word traditionally translated into English as "blessed" or "happy" is in the Greek original μακαριος (makarios). A more literal translation into contemporary English of this thought may be "possessing an inward contentedness and joy that is not affected by physical circumstances"

But, makarios was used historically almost exclusively for the gods,…